Handloom Weaving: A Craft Saved By Village Elders

Telangana and Andhra Pradesh are known worldwide for specialised handloom work. The two states manufacture exclusive sarees with intricate and distinctive designs and the livelihood of lakhs of weavers depend on this industry. Since weaving, a labour intensive job, does not fetch much money, the younger generation is fast moving for other prospects in the cities. However, the older generation in villages continues to weave and save the traditional craft. Here are the glimpses from a household workshop in Koyalagudem village of Nalgonda District, 50 kilometers from Hyderabad, where senior weavers display the intricate process, hard work and deftness required to bring out masterpieces.

(Photo Credit: AFP)

Attention to detail is a must in handloom weaving as one mistake can affect the entire design. In the above image, Karnati Narasimha weaves a saree on a handloom at his household workshop. 

(Photo Credit: AFP)

Weavers can be seen applying natural adhesives to the yarn. The process is known as street sizing. 

(Photo Credit: AFP)

The weaver is seen using a spinning wheel as she transforms hank yarn to linear form wound onto bobbins.

(Photo Credit: AFP)

Karnati Manemma spins yarn with a hand spinning process in her household workshop. 

(Photo Credit: AFP)

Weavers P Venkatesham (L) and P Eshwaramma dye the yarn using natural dyes.

(Photo Credit: AFP)

In the above image, Vanam Pavani works on a spinning wheel as she winds weft yarn. 

(Photo Credit: AFP)

A young weaver wraps yarn around a circular warping drum in her household workshop. The village elders say the younger generation do not find weaving lucrative enough and are moving out to cities in search of alternate professions.

(With inputs from Agence France-Presse) 

6 COMMENTS

  1. Despite Indian handloom being at the centre stage of world fashion, the people responsible for weaving these gorgeous fabrics see no monetary benefit coming their way.

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